more Quotes
Connect with us

agriculture

460 irrigation schemes set for maize – The Herald

Precious Manomano

Herald Reporter

A TOTAL of 460 irrigation schemes have been targeted for maize as efforts to improve agricultural production are escalated to mitigate the effects of climate change.

This season about 90 000 hectares of potential irrigable land have been identified for maize as the Government scales up efforts to boost food production in face of a predicted El Nino season.

Government is targeting to increase the area under irrigation from the current 193 000ha to 350 000ha by 2025 as the country seeks to boost food production.

The intention is to fight the effects of climate change although irrigation farming helps farmers in diversifying their farming operations thereby allowing them to grow crops all year round rather than engaging in seasonal productions.

Speaking during the incentive planning prices for strategic commodities for the 2023/24 season in Harare last week, Lands, Agriculture, Fisheries, Water and Rural Development Minister Dr Anxious Masuka said the country is focusing on maximising irrigation so that it produces sufficient food for its people.

‘’We are also looking at identifying farmers with individual irrigation and all the irrigation schemes, the 460 of them, will be obliged to do some irrigated maize. We have identified 90 000ha of potential irrigation for maize this summer. We now have farmers in every ward and we will be assigning them to Agritex officers so that they come on board”.

The weather forecast for October, November and December for the northern parts of the country indicates normal to below normal rainfall. The Southern parts of the country encompassing Matabeleland North into Northern Midlands , and Matabeleland South will have below normal to normal rains.

The second half of the season is predicted to be normal to below normal for the whole country.

With this prediction, the Government has also put in place 17 additional measures to climate proof agriculture.

Dr Masuka said at household level, farmers should promote sustainable intensive conservation dubbed Pfumvudza-Intwasa adding that what is grown in a particular agro ecological zone is determined not by what a farmer wants but by the exigencies of that agro ecological region.

“You can’t grow maize in region 5 in a season predicted to be below normal so we want that agro ecological tailoring to be sharpened. GMB depots in the specific agro ecological regions will only receive crops that are suitable for those regions. We are engaging all the seed houses so that they don’t sell the wrong crops, wrong varieties in the wrong regions and there is much more that we are doing in terms of climate proofing,’’he said.

The roll out of dam construction countrywide will also boost agricultural production, provide potable water and install mini-hydro power projects as the Second Republic led by President Mnangagwa seeks to revolutionise agriculture, especially for smallholder farmers.

Farmers said irrigation schemes are critical for small holder farmers to improve agricultural production adding that the Government’s move to introduce the system is greatly appreciated.

They also said irrigation schemes constructed so far have turned the areas into green belts.

One of the beneficiaries of Bubi-Lupane irrigation scheme, Mr Martin Hlongwane, said the scheme has helped to transform subsistence agriculture at household level into commercial agriculture as part of rural development and industrialisation in line with vision 2030.

He said following the revitalisation of the scheme in 2021, they have started reaping the rewards of their labour.

“We were unemployed as a family. We struggled to make ends meet until Government availed this opportunity for us. We are grateful as we can now afford to send our children to school,’’ he said. A Chinhoyi farmer Mr Larry Muenza said his crop which is under irrigation was doing well.

“We thank the Government for availing irrigation facilities. In the summer season we can continue with farming, we see the difference with those farmers without irrigation,” he said.

Mr Taurai Mangisi of Katawa in Raffingora said because of climate change, rainfall patterns were no longer predictable and it was risky to depend on rain-fed agriculture.

“Some of us have been on the land for many years and we cannot be spoon-fed all the time. We ask for loan facilities to get irrigation equipment and pay in instalments,” he said.

Zimbabwe Indigenous Women Farmers Trust Mrs Depinah Nkomo said most women farmers did not have irrigation facilities and urged the Government to invest in micro irrigation facilities.

“If every woman can have one hectare under irrigation, we will be able to boost production of earnings from agriculture. We have the land and zeal to farm, but lack of irrigation facilities is affecting us. With irrigation we can grow different types of crops throughout the year and increase profits,” she said.

In a recent interview, the Permanent Secretary for Lands, Agriculture, Fisheries and Rural Development, Dr John Basera, said there is a need to move more towards irrigation development as it is vital for ensuring food security.

“This Agric-Climate Proofing Programme entails massive country-wide water harnessing and irrigation programmes targeting to resuscitate and develop up to 350 000ha under functional irrigation by 2025 from about 150 000 ha in 2020.

“By 2022, the country recorded 193 000 ha under functional irrigation. This thrust will present great opportunities for climate change adaptation in the agriculture production space, thus giving us a chance to go for growth proper and at scale,’’ he said.

The Government created the Irrigation Development Alliance as a vigorous framework that seeks to promote investment in irrigation expansion by supporting partnerships between financial institutions, irrigation companies and farmers.

The programme is part of the Government’s efforts to create an enabling environment for accelerated growth through enhancing irrigation development’s viability and effectiveness to build the country’s resilience to vulnerabilities and shocks that come as a result of climate change.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Notice: Undefined variable: user_ID in /home/zimfocusco/public_html/wp-content/themes/zox-news/comments.php on line 49

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

agriculture

Sadc to tackle water resources management – The Herald

Thupeyo Muleya

Beitbridge Bureau

SADC and its partners are set to discuss strategies to enhance water resources management in the region at the 10th River Basin Organisations and Shared Watercourse Institutions set for Mozambique next month.

The regional organisation, in collaboration with the Limpopo Watercourse Commission (LIMCOM), and with the technical support of the Global Water Partnership Southern Africa (GWPSA) will have high level discussions between October 2 and 4.

So far, Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe which share the Limpopo River Basin, have since re-affirmed the need to collaborate and promote sustainable development of the basin.

Stakeholders from the four nations made the commitment following a series of in-country meetings organised by the LIMCOM to appraise their governments on the implementation of the project.

In a statement yesterday, the Limpopo Watercourse Commission said the water meeting will be held in a hybrid format, and that the physical event will be hosted in Maputo by the Government of Mozambique through the Ministry of Public Works, Housing and Water Resources.

“The theme of the meeting is: Promoting water security through inclusive transboundary conjunctive management and development of water resources,” read part of the media statement.

“This meeting aims to facilitate the exchange of ideas that will enhance effective transboundary water resources planning, development, and management in the region while ensuring environmental sustainability and resilience.

“The target is to improve regional water security towards poverty reduction, and increase regional integration, economic productivity, and industrialisation”.

The meeting is also intended to support the efforts of SADC member states regarding the establishment, institutional development, and strengthening of organisations managing shared river and water resources.

It is envisaged that the platform will build the capacity of member states on other transboundary water resources development and management mechanisms.

The participants are also expected to exchange notes on the best practices on establishing flood forecasting and early warning systems and decision support systems in the SADC region.

“This meeting is a biennial event, which is organised with the aim of engaging river basin organisations as a vehicle for strengthening regional integration and cooperation.

“It also serves as a forum for authorities to share experiences and learn from each other”.

The water resources management indaba will among other things be used to build consensus on the region’s strategic approaches being promoted by SADC to increase water security and resilient development in the region.

This year’s event will bring together representatives of many role players that include development finance institutions, international financiers, climate funds, official development assistance funders and private financiers.

LIMCOM said some participants will be drawn from SADC’s key sectors including energy, food security and trade.

Already Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe have had in-country meetings to appraise their governments on the implementation of the transboundary river basin management project.

LIMCOM executive secretary Mr Sergio Sitoe said recently that the in-country meetings were a huge success.

“Such interactions are critical in promoting ownership of the project and its successful implementation,” he said.

“The Limpopo river basin is one of the major river basins in southern Africa, and it is shared by four countries: Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe”.

Its catchment area is estimated at 408 000 square kilometres and the basin has a population of over 18 million people.

The river flows north from South Africa, where it creates the border between South Africa and Botswana and then the border between South Africa and Zimbabwe, before crossing into Mozambique and draining into the Indian Ocean.

In addition, the basin supports diverse socio-economic activities in the four states including agroindustry, large-scale irrigation, rain-fed subsistence agriculture, mining, eco-tourism, and hosts some of the world’s foremost protected areas.

Continue Reading

agriculture

Three Countries Commit to Safe, Secure and Peaceful Use of … – International Atomic Energy Agency

IAEA Director General Rafael Grossi and A.T Chikondo, Secretary for Project Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation, in the Office of the President and Cabinet of the Republic of Zimbabwe. (Photo: D. Calma/IAEA)

Mr A.T. Chikondo, Secretary for Project Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation, in the Office of the President and Cabinet of the Republic of Zimbabwe, deposited six instruments on behalf of Zimbabwe.

One of these was the instrument of accession to the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, which aims to establish some minimum standards to provide financial protection against damage resulting from certain peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

Instruments of accession were also deposited to the Joint Protocol Relating to the Application of the Vienna Convention and the Paris Convention and the Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage. Since the objectives of the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage are largely mirrored in the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy, the Joint Protocol aims to establish treaty relations between the two Conventions, and to eliminate conflicts that may arise from the simultaneous application of both Conventions to the same nuclear incident.

During the event, Zimbabwe also acceded to the Convention on Nuclear Safety and accepted the Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material as well as the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Agreement, approved by the Board of Governors in 1959, grants immunity to the Agency, its property and assets from legal processes, and gives the Agency the capacity to contract, acquire and dispose of property and institute legal proceedings.

Zimbabwe , which utilizes nuclear technologies in health, agriculture and research, had previously committed to four more multilateral treaties in nuclear safety and security at the Treaty Event during IAEA’s 65th regular session of the General Conference in 2021.

The Treaty Event, convened annually by the IAEA’s Office of Legal Affairs during the annual General Conference, aims to promote universal adherence to the most important multilateral treaties for which the Director General of the IAEA is depositary, and provide an opportunity to Member States to deposit instruments of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession.

Continue Reading

agriculture

Boost for 180 families as irrigation scheme is commercialised – The Herald

Sukulwenkosi Dube-Matutu Bulawayo Bureau

ABOUT 180 families from Gwanda District in Matabeleland South are poised to reap big business spoils following the upgrading of the Tuli Makwe Irrigation Scheme into a vibrant commercial unit in line with the Government’s Vision 2030 Accelerator Model.

Previously, the irrigation scheme operated as a subsistence farming venture and farmers struggled to sustain the project and could not make a positive breakthrough due to a number of challenges.

Under the new model, the Agricultural Rural Development Authority (ARDA) will manage the Tuli Makwe Business Unit on behalf of the villagers to ensure increased production and marketing of produce, which buttresses the rural industrialisation and development drive.

This means that all the shareholders under the business unit will be paid a monthly wage and at the end of the crop cycle they will be able to draw a dividend.

Already, 78 hectares of land at the scheme has been put under winter wheat and farmers expect to harvest about 4,5 tonnes per hectare. Early projections suggest that members are set to receive a combined dividend amounting to about US$1 000 after sales.

Another 34 hectares has been put under maize, 10 hectares under horticulture production and 120 hectares is earmarked for maize production during the forthcoming summer cropping season.

Lands, Agriculture, Fisheries, Water and Rural Development Minister, Dr Anxious Masuka, officially commissioned the upgraded business venture on Friday. He said the irrigation scheme now has to operate as a business that will significantly contribute towards the attainment of Vision 2030.

The minister handed over a certificate of new status to the Tuli Makwe Business Unit chairperson, Mr Louise Ncube, to mark its transformation and revealed that it will receive maize seed and fertiliser under the Presidential Input Scheme.

Tuli Makwe is now part of the 329 of the 460 irrigation schemes that are now under the Vision 2030 Accelerator Model and the Government expects the remainder to be transferred onto the new model by the end of the year.

“All those that have been transferred to this new model have a professional manager stationed at the scheme. All these irrigation schemes have been capacitated to have an irrigated crop under the summer cropping.

“All the 460 irrigation schemes on 26 000 hectares are set to be transformed into business entities.

“The water and land which you have here is your valuable asset. Vision 2030 lies beneath our feet. People from this area shouldn’t go to Bulawayo or South Africa to look for jobs but this is where you can get your income,” said Dr Masuka in his commissioning address.

“We want this scheme to be turned into a business. This is the last time you are calling yourselves farmers as you are now business people.”

Dr Masuku also handed 10 000 chicks to farmers and 20 motorbikes to extension officers to capacitate the teams to ensure the success of the Rural Development Strategy 8.0, which is key to attainment of Vision 2030.

The Government launched the Rural Development 8.0 model aimed at eradicating poverty in all its forms, including food and water poverty through an agricultural development-rural industrialisation-rural development- Vision 2030 nexus.

Dr Masuka said Matabeleland South has 16 irrigation schemes and 13 have been resuscitated as part of efforts by the Government to develop the agricultural sector.

“This new model of running irrigation schemes as a business is the Rural Development Strategy 8.0 launched by the President to transform communities from being economic spectators to economic participants,” said the minister.

In her remarks, Matabeleland South Provincial Affairs and Devolution Minister Dr Evelyn Ndlovu, said the Second Republic has recorded significant development in irrigation schemes, which will go a long way in ensuring food and nutrition security.

She said the province cherishes and is in full support of President Mnangagwa’s vision.

ARDA chief executive officer, Mr Tinotenda Mhiko, said the rural transformation strategy being rolled out at irrigation schemes across the country seeks to see farmers move from subsistence to commercial farming.

“The V30 Accelerator Model in Mat South catalyses rural industrialisation, which in turn catalyses rural development with accelerated attainment of Vision 2030,” he said.

“The model guarantees the viability and profitability and sustainability of the agricultural operations happening here.

“Farmers are guaranteed an income through monthly wages and dividends after they harvest and market the produce. The farmers are managed and hand held by a resident ARDA scheme business manager hence they are well aligned to Government’s vision.”

For the past five years, the vast tract of arable land at Tuli Makwe Irrigation Scheme was lying idle despite its huge potential to improve the locals’ livelihoods.

President Mnangagwa launched the Arda Vision 2030 Accelerator Model Programme at Bubi-Lupane Irrigation Scheme in September 2021.

The model is now being replicated in 460 irrigation schemes across the country and seeks to stimulate rural industrialisation through agricultural development in line with Vision 2030, which is anchored on driving the country’s economy into an upper-middle-income.

The Government has also developed the National Accelerated Irrigation Rehabilitation and Development Programme anchored by the Agricultural and Food Systems Transformation Strategy, which seeks to strengthen resilience and agricultural livelihoods of vulnerable communities.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2021 ZimFocus.

www.luzroyale.ky/

www.1africafocus.com

www.zimfocus.co.zw

www.classifieds.com/

One Zimbabwe Classifieds | ZimMarket

www.classifiedszim.com

www.1zimbabweclassifieds.co.zw

www.1southafricaclassifieds.com

www.1africaclassifieds.com

www.1usaclassifieds.com

www.computertraining.co.zw/

www.1itonlinetraining.com/

www.bbs-bitsbytesandstem.com/

Zimbabwe Market Classifieds | ZimMarket

1 Zimbabwe Market Classifieds | ZimMarket

www.1zimlegends.com

Linking Buyers To Sellers Is Our Business Tradition