more Quotes
Connect with us

health

Factbox: Kenya’s 2022 presidential election contenders – NewsDay

Kenya holds a presidential election on Aug. 9 with opinion polls predicting a tight race between veteran opposition leader Raila Odinga and serving Deputy President William Ruto.

Incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta, constitutionally barred from seeking a third five-year term, has publicly criticised his deputy and endorsed Odinga.

Kenyatta’s Kikuyu ethnic group, the nation’s most populous, has produced three of four presidents since independence from Britain in 1963, but does not have a presidential candidate this time. Recognising the importance of ethnic voting blocs, both frontrunners have picked a Kikuyu vice president.

Presidential candidates George Wajackoyah and David Mwaure Waihiga are polling in low single-digit numbers, but votes going their way might mean neither Odinga nor Ruto secure a majority, pushing the race to a second round.

WILLIAM RUTO

Ruto heads the Kenya Kwanza (Kenya First) Alliance and served as a lawmaker and minister for agriculture before becoming deputy president.

In the 2007 election, Ruto sided with Odinga and lost. Around 1,200 people were killed in the violence that followed.

He was later charged with crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Court for his alleged role in the violence, but the case collapsed. He denied any wrongdoing.

In 2013 and 2017, he teamed up with Kenyatta to defeat Odinga.

An eloquent orator, 55-year-old teetotaller Ruto has pledged to boost spending for small farmers and private businesses, and reform national health insurance and social security funds.

Ruto portrays himself as a former roadside chicken seller representing working-class “hustlers” against wealthy political “dynasties”.

RAILA ODINGA

Odinga is running for president under the Azimio La Umoja (Declaration of Unity) Alliance, which includes Kenyatta’s Jubilee party. Odinga is the son of the nation’s first vice president, while Kenyatta is the son of the first president.

A former political prisoner, Odinga says the last three elections were stolen from him. Deadly violence followed the disputed 2007 and 2017 votes.

Odinga has pledged to stamp out widespread graft and give a monthly stipend to the unemployed, universal healthcare and free education to all. He named his eldest son Fidel in a nod to his left-wing sympathies.

His political heartland is in western Kenya, whose residents have in the past complained of neglect by the government due to their support for the opposition.

GEORGE WAJACKOYAH

Wajackoyah, 63, who describes himself as a lawyer, academic and former spy, is running under the Roots Party of Kenya banner.

He pledges to legalise cultivating marijuana for industrial and medicinal use, and export hyena testicles and snake venom to help pay Kenya’s external public debt.

He also plans to suspend parts of the constitution for six months and hang anyone convicted of corruption.

He has attracted some young voters and enraged many religious leaders.

DAVID MWAURE WAIHIGA

Waihiga, also a lawyer, is running on the Agano Party of Kenya ticket.

He pledges to tackle government graft, and publish the government contracts for major infrastructure projects such as railways, ports and highways.-Reuters

Continue Reading
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

health

KL Rahul cleared to play Zimbabwe series, will captain the side | Cricbuzz.com – Cricbuzz – Cricbuzz

KL Rahul has received the green signal from BCCI’s medical team, clearing his participation in the forthcoming three-ODI tour of Zimbabwe. Shikhar Dhawan, originally named captain for the short tour, will serve as the deputy to the returning Rahul.

Rahul, who has not played international cricket since February this year, has been laid low by a series of injury and health concerns. Right after the IPL, he was scheduled to captain India in the home T20Is against South Africa but missed out owing to a groin injury. The spell on the sidelines was extended after it was revealed that the 30-year-old would require surgery. Consequently, Rahul missed the tour of England and Ireland.

He was scheduled to return at the just-concluded tour of West Indies and USA but following a positive Covid-19 result, the BCCI medical team advised him rest. He has already been named in India’s squad for the Asia Cup at the end of this month.

India squad: KL Rahul (c) Shikhar Dhawan (vc), Ruturaj Gaikwad, Shubman Gill, Deepak Hooda, Rahul Tripathi, Ishan Kishan (wicket-keeper), Sanju Samson (wicket-keeper), Washington Sundar, Shardul Thakur, Kuldeep Yadav, Axar Patel, Avesh Khan, Prasidh Krishna, Mohd Siraj, Deepak Chahar.

All the three ODIs of India’s tour will be held at the Harare Sports Club, with the series kicking off on August 18.

Continue Reading

health

KL Rahul cleared to play Zimbabwe series, will captain the side | Cricbuzz.com – Cricbuzz – Cricbuzz

KL Rahul has received the green signal from BCCI’s medical team, clearing his participation in the forthcoming three-ODI tour of Zimbabwe. Shikhar Dhawan, originally named captain for the short tour, will serve as the deputy to the returning Rahul.

Rahul, who has not played international cricket since February this year, has been laid low by a series of injury and health concerns. Right after the IPL, he was scheduled to captain India in the home T20Is against South Africa but missed out owing to a groin injury. The spell on the sidelines was extended after it was revealed that the 30-year-old would require surgery. Consequently, Rahul missed the tour of England and Ireland.

He was scheduled to return at the just-concluded tour of West Indies and USA but following a positive Covid-19 result, the BCCI medical team advised him rest. He has already been named in India’s squad for the Asia Cup at the end of this month.

India squad: KL Rahul (c) Shikhar Dhawan (vc), Ruturaj Gaikwad, Shubman Gill, Deepak Hooda, Rahul Tripathi, Ishan Kishan (wicket-keeper), Sanju Samson (wicket-keeper), Washington Sundar, Shardul Thakur, Kuldeep Yadav, Axar Patel, Avesh Khan, Prasidh Krishna, Mohd Siraj, Deepak Chahar.

All the three ODIs of India’s tour will be held at the Harare Sports Club, with the series kicking off on August 18.

Continue Reading

health

Decriminalizing HIV: Scientifically proven and morally correct – STAT

One hundred thirty-four. That’s the number of countries that currently criminalize or prosecute people based on general criminal laws of HIV transmission, non-disclosure, or exposure.

Not only is this contrary to science on the health and human rights benefits of decriminalization, but it stands in stark contrast to the commitments enshrined in the 2021 Political Declaration to ends AIDS by 2030, which was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly with 165 countries voting in favor. Worse still is that criminalizing HIV is actively harmful: it costs lives and wastes money.

Countries that criminalize people with HIV have lower rates of HIV treatment and viral suppression compared to those with non-discriminatory legal frameworks. For example, evidence shows that decriminalizing sex work would avert at least one-third of new HIV infections among female sex workers.

advertisement

Sex workers, along with men who have sex with men, transgender people, people who inject drugs and their sexual partners, and others represent key populations at higher risk of acquiring HIV. Together, they bear the brunt of the HIV pandemic: 70% of new HIV cases in 2021 occurred among these populations, accounting for more than half of all new cases in sub-Saharan Africa for the first time.

People-centered, equity-first policies that enable access to HIV services must be scaled up. To end AIDS as a public health threat, the world needs to achieve the UNAIDS 10-10-10 targets: less than 10% of people living with HIV and key populations experiencing stigma and discrimination; less than 10% of people living with HIV, women and girls, and key populations experiencing gender-based inequalities and gender-based violence; and less than 10% of countries with legal and policy environments that deny or limit access to HIV services.

advertisement

The United Nations Development Programme, which I work for, has convened the Global Commission on HIV and the Law to help countries and communities dismantle discriminatory laws that unjustly punish people, trap them in a cycle of illness and poverty, and prevent progress toward ending AIDS.

To date, the commission’s recommendations have helped at least 90 countries advance legal reforms. While no country is on track to meeting the 10-10-10 targets, the actions of these 90 countries show that change is possible. I offer three concrete strategies to drive further progress based on lessons learned from decriminalization efforts.

First, a whole-of-society approach led by people living with HIV and key populations has proven the most effective path to change. Laws are shaped and enforced by complex networks of parliamentarians, law enforcement, lawyers, and judges. Changing laws and removing barriers requires engaging these authorities and sensitizing them to the lived realities of HIV-positive people and key populations. Conducting government-led participatory legal environment assessments, which meaningfully engage communities, has been successful in advancing legal reform, including decriminalization of HIV.

In 2019, the UNDP worked with Zimbabwe to conduct a legal environment assessment, which identified criminalization as a barrier to health care and a driver of stigma. Based on these results, stakeholders including Zimbabwe’s National AIDS Council, Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights, parliamentarians, civil society activists and key populations worked to advocate for decriminalization. In early 2022, Zimbabwe repealed its legal code criminalizing HIV.

Second, a well-informed judiciary is often key to protecting the rights of vulnerable people and laying the groundwork for more inclusive legal systems. Ensuring that judges have up-to-date information on the science of HIV results in more informed rulings and drives positive change. This includes preventing overly broad interpretation of the law, such as Covid-19 lockdown policies that were used to justify the arrest of 23 people at a shelter for homeless LGBTQ+ youths in Uganda. Many of them were later released by the order of a Ugandan court.

Safe spaces for peer-led conversations can be a critical venue for disseminating this kind of information. The UNDP supports regional networks of judges in Africa, Europe and Central Asia, and the Caribbean. These forums provide an opportunity to share the latest knowledge on HIV science, public health, law, human rights, and the lived experiences of key populations. The results speak for themselves: In July, the high court of Antigua and Barbuda struck down its laws criminalizing sex between consenting same-sex adults.

Third, decriminalization must be complemented by the creation of legal environments that actively safeguard human rights and protect vulnerable communities from stigma and discrimination. Access to legal services is a cornerstone of an enabling legal environment, but only 41% of countries report having mechanisms to connect people living with HIV and key populations to services. This disconnect with legal services has a real effect. In a survey of people in 18 countries, over the last 12 months less than 50% of people living with HIV whose rights were abused sought legal redress.

Civil society organizations, like the Caribbean Vulnerable Communities Coalition and Andrey Rylkov Foundation for Health and Social Justice, play essential roles in delivering services to and advocating for people living with HIV and key populations. But countries are increasingly passing laws that restrict the ability of these kinds of non-governmental organizations to operate. In 2019, 50 countries had drafted legislation or implemented laws that prevent NGOs from performing their work. Since then, restrictive legislation has continued to appear, in Mexico, Tunisia, and elsewhere. The UNDP is working with multiple stakeholders on strategies to create an open civic space and legal environments which allow full engagement of civil society.

Efforts to halt the spread of HIV and to care for people living with it are far less effective in countries that criminalize people living with HIV and key populations, and decriminalization efforts are moving far too slowly. There is, however, cause for hope. At the recently-concluded 24th International AIDS Conference in Montreal, there was a sense of renewed purpose, solidarity and a recognition of the need to urgently advance decriminalization efforts.

If the world does not act on the science now; move toward decriminalizing and stop prosecuting people for HIV transmission, non-disclosure, or exposure; and deliver on its obligations, it won’t be possible to end AIDS as a public health threat by 2030.

Mandeep Dhaliwal is the director of the HIV and Health Group for the United Nations Development Programme.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2021 ZimFocus.

www.luzroyale.ky/

www.1africafocus.com

www.zimfocus.co.zw

www.classifieds.com/

One Zimbabwe Classifieds | ZimMarket

www.classifiedszim.com

www.1zimbabweclassifieds.co.zw

www.1southafricaclassifieds.com

www.1africaclassifieds.com

www.1usaclassifieds.com

www.computertraining.co.zw/

www.1itonlinetraining.com/

www.bbs-bitsbytesandstem.com/

Zimbabwe Market Classifieds | ZimMarket

1 Zimbabwe Market Classifieds | ZimMarket

www.1zimlegends.com

Linking Buyers To Sellers Is Our Business Tradition