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Baba Harare Merges Jiti, Gospel in Vaccine Album – New Zimbabwe.com


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By Paidashe Mandivengerei


JITI musician, Baba Harare has dropped his sixth studio album ‘Vaccine’ which sees the merging of gospel and jiti genres.

The album has a total of six tracks including three collaborations with local artists from various genres.

Songs on the album in their chronological order are Vaccine (ft Kae Chaps and Joseph Tivafire), Rinonaka, Love in the Air (ft Da Ruler), Wemberi Wemberi, Ex Tsano (ft Sulumani Chimbetu) and Nditarire Nekufara.

Visuals of the title track ‘Vaccine’ set on an apostolic church shrine dropped on Sunday.

In ‘Rinonaka’ the artist takes music lovers down memory lane incorporating his famous guitar sound common on old Jah Prayzah tracks where he was lead guitarist of the Third Generation band before pursuing a solo music career.

He wraps up the album with Nditarire Nekufara a remake of his church, Methodist’s popular hymn 117 with the same title.

Vaccine was produced by renowned producers, Nyasha Timbe, Maselo and Gibson Makumbe polishing two tracks each to deliver the album.

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Paradox Interactive : Date for Europa Universalis IV Immersion Pack Announced – marketscreener.com

African Themed Add-On Coming 11 November

Oct. 19, 2021 – STOCKHOLM – The gold of Zimbabwe. The ivory of Central Africa. The great city of Timbuktu. The temples of Ethiopia. Africa is the birthplace of humanity and a land of untold wealth and variety. Rediscover and rewrite the history of the continent in a new immersion pack for Europa Universalis IV, coming 11 November, 2021. It will be available for the suggested retail price of $9.99/£7.19/€9.99.

In Europa Universalis IV: Origins, new African missions add greater variety and new goals for some of Africa’s most powerful and interesting nations. The fading giant of Mali, the holy hills of Ethiopia and the African trade centers of the Indian Ocean are given new depth and richer context.

See a trailer here: https://youtu.be/oiQUtgKc46M

The Europa Universalis IV: Origins immersion pack adds:

  • Jewish Religion: The Ethiopian Jews of Beta Israel are included, and Jewish nations can choose from nine religious characteristics to accentuate their national strengths, with new flavor events.
  • Missions for Mali: Halt the decline of West Africa’s greatest medieval empire and reassert control of former vassals.
  • Missions for Songhai: Develop your provinces and claim the mantles of Mali and Timbuktu as the new rising power.
  • Missions for Kongo: Unite the peoples of the Congo River and confront the growing European threat.
  • Missions for Ethiopia: Ensure religious unity and prestige in the Kingdom of Solomon while unifying the nations of the African Horn. Also adds the noble Ç̌äwa regiments.
  • Missions for Ajuuraan: Control Indian Ocean trade and bring water to your desert provinces.
  • Missions for Kilwa: Focus on naval economic power, establishing a colonial empire across the seas.
  • Missions for Mutapa: Build on the legacy of the founders of Great Zimbabwe and exploit the riches of South Africa to dominate trade.
  • Minor Mission Additions: New mission options for Jolof, Mossi, Hausa, Oyo and Adal.
  • New Regional Mission Trees: New Missions for minor powers in Central, East and West Africa, and the African Horn, as well as new estate privileges for many nations and regions.
  • New Army Sprites: 4 new army sprites each for Congo, Great Lakes, Southern Africa and Bantu nations.
  • Two New Missionary models: African Coptic and African Fetishist missionary animations added.
  • New Music: 12 minutes of new West African themed music, and 12 minutes of new East African themed music.

As usual, the release of Europa Universalis IV: Origins will be accompanied by a major update, free for all EU4 players.

For additional information, please contact:

Fredrik Wester, CEO Paradox InteractiveAlexander Bricca, CFO Paradox Interactive
Email: [email protected]
Phone: +4670-355 54 18

About Paradox Interactive

The Paradox group today consists of both publishing and internal development of games and brands. The game portfolio includes more than 100 titles and Paradox owns the most important brands, including Stellaris, Europa Universalis, Hearts of Iron, Crusader Kings, Cities: Skylines, Prison Architect, Magicka, Age of Wonders and the World of Darkness catalogue of brands. From the start 2004, the company has published its games all over the world, initially through physical distribution but since 2006 primarily in digital channels. Paradox games are developed primarily for PC and console platforms, but the company also releases games on mobile. The largest markets today include the US, UK, China, Germany, France, Russia and Scandinavia. Today, over five million gamers play a Paradox game each month and the number of registered Paradox users exceeds 18 million.

Paradox Interactive AB (publ)’s shares are listed on Nasdaq Stockholm First North Premier under ticker PDX. Certified Advisor: FNCA Sweden AB, [email protected], +46-8-528 00 399. For more information, please visit www.paradoxinteractive.com.

https://news.cision.com/paradox-interactive-ab/r/date-for-europa-universalis-iv-immersion-pack-announced,c3435681

(c) 2021 Cision. All rights reserved., source Press Releases – English

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Zim-Born Ruva Chigwedere (21) Transforms US Havard Theatre – New Zimbabwe.com

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Harvard Crimson


“TO ME, leadership has always meant service,” said singer, actor, and writer Ruva Chigwedere ‘21. In her four years at Harvard, she honed her craft and created spaces for Black artists on campus.

Chigwedere immigrated to the United States from Zimbabwe at age four. When she moved from New Jersey to Cambridge for college, she planned to study economics in the hopes of securing a stable job; a career in the arts didn’t guarantee that.

However, she soon realised that her true passion was acting, and so decided to gain as much experience in Harvard theater productions as possible. Chigwedere eventually chose to concentrate jointly in Theatre, Dance, and Media and History and Literature.

Chigwedere attended the Shakespeare Summer School Program at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts and played Kate in “Taming of the Shrew.”

Then, in the fall of 2018, Chigwedere auditioned for the Harvard College Opera production of “Cendrillon.”

Though initially cast in a featured ensemble role, the directors promoted her to the principal role of Dorothée. Chigwedere emphasized how the production allowed her to gain much more experience in a short amount of time.

Chigwedere also joined the Kuumba Singers, which was founded in 1970 in the midst of the political turmoil of the Civil Rights Movement, two years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

“They were one of the spaces in the Black community that I felt most at home in,” Ruva says. She also stressed the importance of the group’s continuing legacy of Black community organizing.

“The spirit of [the Kuumba Singers] really mimics some of the Black community organizations that were fighting for justice during the time,” she said.

Chigwedere’s contributions to the Harvard community don’t stop there: She also expanded the reach of the Harvard Black Community & Student Theatre Group, or BlackC.A.S.T., a student-run organization that supports Black student theater artists.

When Chigwedere arrived at Harvard, the organization had taken a long hiatus, and its reputation was less than stellar.

“The stereotype that BlackC.A.S.T. had in the Harvard theater community at the time was that they couldn’t put together a good show,” Chigwedere says. Hoping to reinvigorate the group, she joined the board, serving as secretary and then co-president.

One of her goals was addressing the organization’s lack of institutional memory and creating mechanisms for passing down knowledge about theater to younger students.

“There are people who know how to do things, individual people have their connections to different groups. That has been one of BlackC.A.S.T.’s strengths, but also its greatest fault: that things end with people,” Chigwedere says. “Once a person graduates, a connection is lost.”

Her other accomplishments with BlackC.A.S.T. include solidifying the group’s relationship with other Harvard theater institutions — such as the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club and the American Repertory Theatre — and reaffirming its connections with other Black student organizations.

As a sophomore, Chigwedere directed the Black Playwrights Festival, an annual showcase of student works.

The 2021 Festival, which took place virtually in March, focused on the theme “Some Kind of Tomorrow,” featuring readings from five student playwrights and a conversation with playwrights Lydia R. Diamond and Michael R. Jackson.

Chigwedere’s desire to cultivate a space for the Black artistic community at Harvard came out of her appreciation for Black students before her who created safer spaces.

“Yes, this is a white supremacist institution. And there’s so many different things that have happened that have been traumatizing, or that have been painful for me to experience as a Black person,” she said.

“But I’m able to take up space and to be seen as [making] valuable contributions on this campus because of those people.”

Still, Chigwedere has long been frustrated by the treatment of Black women in Harvard theater. “It made me really sad to see … how Black women were systematically kept out of different places,” she said.

And the problem isn’t unique to Harvard. Chigwedere realized while reading her program at a West End production of “Dreamgirls” that there is a dearth of roles for Black women in theater. “In every one of those actors’ resumes, they were either Deena or Effie in “Dreamgirls” and they were either Celie or Nettie in “The Color Purple,” she says.

“There are just two roles out there.” Her desire to change that narrative motivated her to write her senior thesis, a play titled “For Daughters of Ezili; or, How to be a Black Girl and Find Love and Survive 101.”

“I’m going to need to create something for me in order to be able to work,” Chigwedere says. The result was a celebration of Black women’s complexity and joy. After graduation, Ruva continued to develop her thesis play for production, and is planning to possibly audition for conservatory and write her own music.

Her advice to current students? Prioritize. “I wish I could shake every single Harvard student,” she said. “The more you stretch yourself thin, the more you will hate all the things that you actually love doing.”

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Zim-Born Ruva Chigwdere (21) Transforms US Havard Theatre – New Zimbabwe.com

Spread This News

Harvard Crimson


“TO ME, leadership has always meant service,” said singer, actor, and writer Ruva Chigwedere ‘21. In her four years at Harvard, she honed her craft and created spaces for Black artists on campus.

Chigwedere immigrated to the United States from Zimbabwe at age four. When she moved from New Jersey to Cambridge for college, she planned to study economics in the hopes of securing a stable job; a career in the arts didn’t guarantee that.

However, she soon realised that her true passion was acting, and so decided to gain as much experience in Harvard theater productions as possible. Chigwedere eventually chose to concentrate jointly in Theatre, Dance, and Media and History and Literature.

Chigwedere attended the Shakespeare Summer School Program at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts and played Kate in “Taming of the Shrew.”

Then, in the fall of 2018, Chigwedere auditioned for the Harvard College Opera production of “Cendrillon.”

Though initially cast in a featured ensemble role, the directors promoted her to the principal role of Dorothée. Chigwedere emphasized how the production allowed her to gain much more experience in a short amount of time.

Chigwedere also joined the Kuumba Singers, which was founded in 1970 in the midst of the political turmoil of the Civil Rights Movement, two years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

“They were one of the spaces in the Black community that I felt most at home in,” Ruva says. She also stressed the importance of the group’s continuing legacy of Black community organizing.

“The spirit of [the Kuumba Singers] really mimics some of the Black community organizations that were fighting for justice during the time,” she said.

Chigwedere’s contributions to the Harvard community don’t stop there: She also expanded the reach of the Harvard Black Community & Student Theatre Group, or BlackC.A.S.T., a student-run organization that supports Black student theater artists.

When Chigwedere arrived at Harvard, the organization had taken a long hiatus, and its reputation was less than stellar.

“The stereotype that BlackC.A.S.T. had in the Harvard theater community at the time was that they couldn’t put together a good show,” Chigwedere says. Hoping to reinvigorate the group, she joined the board, serving as secretary and then co-president.

One of her goals was addressing the organization’s lack of institutional memory and creating mechanisms for passing down knowledge about theater to younger students.

“There are people who know how to do things, individual people have their connections to different groups. That has been one of BlackC.A.S.T.’s strengths, but also its greatest fault: that things end with people,” Chigwedere says. “Once a person graduates, a connection is lost.”

Her other accomplishments with BlackC.A.S.T. include solidifying the group’s relationship with other Harvard theater institutions — such as the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club and the American Repertory Theatre — and reaffirming its connections with other Black student organizations.

As a sophomore, Chigwedere directed the Black Playwrights Festival, an annual showcase of student works.

The 2021 Festival, which took place virtually in March, focused on the theme “Some Kind of Tomorrow,” featuring readings from five student playwrights and a conversation with playwrights Lydia R. Diamond and Michael R. Jackson.

Chigwedere’s desire to cultivate a space for the Black artistic community at Harvard came out of her appreciation for Black students before her who created safer spaces.

“Yes, this is a white supremacist institution. And there’s so many different things that have happened that have been traumatizing, or that have been painful for me to experience as a Black person,” she said.

“But I’m able to take up space and to be seen as [making] valuable contributions on this campus because of those people.”

Still, Chigwedere has long been frustrated by the treatment of Black women in Harvard theater. “It made me really sad to see … how Black women were systematically kept out of different places,” she said.

And the problem isn’t unique to Harvard. Chigwedere realized while reading her program at a West End production of “Dreamgirls” that there is a dearth of roles for Black women in theater. “In every one of those actors’ resumes, they were either Deena or Effie in “Dreamgirls” and they were either Celie or Nettie in “The Color Purple,” she says.

“There are just two roles out there.” Her desire to change that narrative motivated her to write her senior thesis, a play titled “For Daughters of Ezili; or, How to be a Black Girl and Find Love and Survive 101.”

“I’m going to need to create something for me in order to be able to work,” Chigwedere says. The result was a celebration of Black women’s complexity and joy. After graduation, Ruva continued to develop her thesis play for production, and is planning to possibly audition for conservatory and write her own music.

Her advice to current students? Prioritize. “I wish I could shake every single Harvard student,” she said. “The more you stretch yourself thin, the more you will hate all the things that you actually love doing.”

Continue Reading

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