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Khama Billiat Refuses To Speak To Zimbabwe Media Ahead Of World Cup Qualifier Against Ghana – iharare.com

Khama Billiat Refuses To Speak To Zimbabwe Media Ahead Of World Cup Qualifier Against Ghana

Khama Billiat Refuses To Speak To Zimbabwe Media Ahead Of World Cup Qualifier Against Ghana

Khama Billiat Refuses To Speak To Zimbabwe Media Ahead Of World Cup Qualifier Against Ghana

Zimbabwe Warriors star player Khama Billiat has sparked controversy after refusing to speak to the local media ahead of Tuesday’s match against Ghana. Zimbabwe is hosting Ghana in the return fixture of the 2022 FIFA World Cup Qualifiers – Group G at the National Sports Stadium on Tuesday.

On Monday, the Zimbabwe Warriors technical team kicked out all the local media from the National Sports Stadium where they were holding their final training session ahead of the match. Ironically, the Black Stars of Ghana allowed the media full access to their training session.

While the team’s attitude towards the media was criticised, Billiat was accused of vowing not to speak to the media. The star forward was criticised for his apparent arrogance by journalists. He was also accused of hypocrisy, for wanting the media to promote his exploits while not holding him accountable for his performances.

Speaking on the matter, sports journalist Farayi Machamire wrote,

It’s even more pathetic that @khama_Billiat11 has vowed not to speak to Zim media & those in Warriors’ authority have allowed him to continue with his narcissistic arrogance.

Anyway, good riddance he is on his way out. He will soon be forgotten.

Khama Billiat Refuses To Speak To Zimbabwe Media Ahead Of World Cup Qualifier Against Ghana
Khama Billiat Refuses To Speak To Zimbabwe Media Ahead Of World Cup Qualifier Against Ghana

Billiat and the Warriors attitude towards the media have resulted in mixed reactions from Zimbabweans on social media. Some criticised the Kaizer Chiefs star and the Zimbabwe national team for their arrogance which does not seem to match their results on the pitch. However, others defended them, saying they are entitled to not speak to the media, when they do not feel like it.

Below are some of the reactions from social media.


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    UN envoy meets Mnangagwa over Zimbabwe sanctions – SowetanLIVE

    Zimbabwean president Emmerson Mnangagwa says the sanctions are illegal. File photo.

    Zimbabwean president Emmerson Mnangagwa says the sanctions are illegal. File photo.
    Image: REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo

    Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Monday welcomed the UN Special Rapporteur on the Negative Impact of Unilateral Coercive Measures on Human Rights in Harare.

    The envoy, Belarusian Alena Douhan, who is also a professor of international law, met President Emmerson Mnangagwa at State House.

    In a statement the presidency said her 10-day trip aimed to “assess the impact of punitive economic sanctions on ordinary Zimbabweans”.

    “These sanctions are illegal and hurt the most vulnerable in our society,” the presidency said.

    Douhan also held a meeting with the minister of justice and legal affairs Ziyambi Ziyambi who gave the envoy an overview on the sanctions.

    “We met the special rapporteur as the ministry of justice to give an overview of the effects of sanctions, but I am afraid that now we are unable to give details, or deliberations as you are aware they are on a fact-finding mission to establish the extent of the effects of sanctions on the ordinary people,” Ziyambi told journalists.

    During the 10-day visit the special envoy will be in contact with civic society groups, Zimbabwe’s chief justice Luke Malaba, Central Bank governor John Mangudya, speaker of parliament Jacob Mudenda and political parties.

    From her visit she’s expected to produce a report that will be made public in September next year at the UN Human Rights Council 51st session.

    The US through the Zimbabwe Democracy and Economic Recovery Act of 2001 (ZIDERA) placed an embargo on Zimbabwe’s ruling elite and companies linked to them because of an escalation in human rights violations linked to politics.

    The European Union followed suit in 2002 through “common position 2002/145/CSFP”.

    Over the years, the ruling party Zanu-PF has maintained that the sanctions affect ordinary citizens. But Western countries insist that Zimbabwe should put in place reforms and strong institutions to curb corruption, promote human rights and democracy for sanctions to be removed.

    The EU and the US review their sanctions lists annually and last year they added President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s special adviser and businessman Kudakwashe Tagwirei to the list.

    TimesLIVE

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    Politics

    UN envoy meets Mnangagwa over Zimbabwe sanctions – TimesLIVE

    Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Monday welcomed the UN Special Rapporteur on the Negative Impact of Unilateral Coercive Measures on Human Rights in Harare.

    The envoy, Belarusian Alena Douhan, who is also a professor of international law, met President Emmerson Mnangagwa at State House.

    In a statement the presidency said her 10-day trip aimed to “assess the impact of punitive economic sanctions on ordinary Zimbabweans”.

    “These sanctions are illegal and hurt the most vulnerable in our society,” the presidency said.

    Douhan also held a meeting with the minister of justice and legal affairs Ziyambi Ziyambi who gave the envoy an overview on the sanctions.

    “We met the special rapporteur as the ministry of justice to give an overview of the effects of sanctions, but I am afraid that now we are unable to give details, or deliberations as you are aware they are on a fact-finding mission to establish the extent of the effects of sanctions on the ordinary people,” Ziyambi told journalists.

    During the 10-day visit the special envoy will be in contact with civic society groups, Zimbabwe’s chief justice Luke Malaba, Central Bank governor John Mangudya, speaker of parliament Jacob Mudenda and political parties.

    From her visit she’s expected to produce a report that will be made public in September next year at the UN Human Rights Council 51st session.

    The US through the Zimbabwe Democracy and Economic Recovery Act of 2001 (ZIDERA) placed an embargo on Zimbabwe’s ruling elite and companies linked to them because of an escalation in human rights violations linked to politics.

    The European Union followed suit in 2002 through “common position 2002/145/CSFP”.

    Over the years, the ruling party Zanu-PF has maintained that the sanctions affect ordinary citizens. But Western countries insist that Zimbabwe should put in place reforms and strong institutions to curb corruption, promote human rights and democracy for sanctions to be removed.

    The EU and the US review their sanctions lists annually and last year they added President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s special adviser and businessman Kudakwashe Tagwirei to the list.

    TimesLIVE

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    Politics

    Colin Powell, military leader and first Black US secretary of state, dies after complications from Covid-19 – NewsDay

    He shared Bush’s reluctance to project military strength across the globe, a view that was quickly displaced by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

    As Bush’s top diplomat, he was tasked with building international support for the War on Terror, including the Afghanistan War, but it was his involvement in the administration’s push for intervention in Iraq, over the concerns of many of America’s longtime allies, for which his tenure at State would become best known.

    In February 2003, Powell delivered a speech before the United Nations in which he presented evidence that the US intelligence community said proved Iraq had misled inspectors and hid weapons of mass destruction.
    “There can be no doubt,” Powell warned, “that Saddam Hussein has biological weapons and the capability to rapidly produce more, many more.”

    Inspectors, however, later found no such weaponry in Iraq, and two years after Powell’s UN speech, a government report said the intelligence community was “dead wrong” in its assessments of Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction capabilities before the US invasion.

    But the damage was already done — to both Iraq, which the US went to war with just six weeks after Powell’s speech, and to the reputation of the once highly popular statesman, who was reportedly told by then-Vice President Dick Cheney before the UN speech: “You’ve got high poll ratings; you can afford to lose a few points.”

    Powell, who left the State Department in early 2005 after submitting his resignation to Bush the previous year, later called his UN speech a “blot” that will forever be on his record.

    “I regret it now because the information was wrong — of course I do,” he told CNN’s Larry King in 2010. “But I will always be seen as the one who made the case before the international community.”

    “I swayed public opinion, there’s no question about it,” he added, referring to how influential his speech was on public support for the invasion.

    In his 2012 memoir, “It Worked for Me,” Powell again acknowledged the speech, writing that his account of it in the book would likely be the last he publicly made.

    “I am mad mostly at myself for not having smelled the problem. My instincts failed me,” he wrote, referring to the report he used that contained faulty evidence of supposed Iraqi WMDs. “It was by no means my first, but it was one of my most momentous failures, the one with the widest-ranging impact.”

    “The event will earn a prominent paragraph in my obituary,” Powell wrote.

    Shifting politics

    After leaving the Bush administration, Powell returned to private life. He joined the renowned venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins in 2005, where he worked as a strategic adviser until his death. For a time, he gave speeches at “Get Motivated!” business seminars, and he authored the 2012 memoir.

    Though the large majority of Powell’s time as a public servant was spent in Republican administrations, the later years of his life saw him supporting Democratic presidential candidates and harshly criticizing top Republican leaders.

    By 2008, the longtime Republican’s coveted presidential endorsement went to another party when he announced his support for Obama’s White House bid. At the time, he touted Obama’s “ability to inspire” and the “inclusive nature of his campaign,” while criticizing attacks on the Illinois senator by Republican presidential nominee John McCain’s campaign as “inappropriate.” He was later named an honorary co-chair of Obama’s inauguration and endorsed him again in 2012.

    Powell went on to vote for Hillary Clinton in 2016 over Donald Trump, whom he had strongly condemned as a “national disgrace and an international pariah.”

    In an extraordinary move that year, three presidential electors in Washington state cast votes for Powell rather than Clinton, resulting in state fines that were later upheld by the Supreme Court.
    He again snubbed Trump in 2020 during the President’s second campaign, announcing his support for Joe Biden in June of that year while blasting Trump’s presidency.
    “We have a Constitution. And we have to follow that Constitution. And the President has drifted away from it,” he told CNN, adding that he “certainly cannot in any way support President Trump this year.” The retired general later delivered an address in support of Biden during the Democratic National Convention.

    And after Trump incited a deadly insurrection at the US Capitol in early January 2021, Powell told CNN that he no longer considered himself a Republican, with the longtime grandee of the GOP saying he was now simply watching events unfold in a country he long served.

    “I can no longer call myself a fellow Republican. I’m not a fellow of anything right now,” he told CNN’s Fareed Zakaria on “GPS.” “I’m just a citizen who has voted Republican, voted Democrat throughout my entire career. And right now, I’m just watching my country and not concerned with parties.” – CNN

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