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Zimbabwe: Mafireyi Makes Grand Gospel Entrance – AllAfrica.com

Rising gospel hip hop musician Tendai Mafireyi, who has just released his new single “We Gonna Make It” from his forthcoming album “Finally Free”, describes his new song as a gift from God.

According to Mafireyi, the single serves as his grand entrance on the gospel hip-hop scene.

“‘We Gonna Make It’ is reverberating God’s love towards us on the cross. It is a song of hope given the situation we have been through in the past two years because of the Covid-19 pandemic.”

The song, which is currently trending on social media, was produced by Samuel Terrazzino and Yellow Trash Can.

“For now, it is being streamed on YouTube, Spotify, Apple Music among others,” said Mafireyi. “Since I am not based in Zimbabwe, I have sent the link to radio stations and am waiting for it to play on local platforms too. I will be releasing a video soon, just that work pressure has been affecting me a lot.”

Mafireyi said the album will be out in two weeks and preparations were at an advanced stage.

“Many people have been asking about the name of my album and why I named it like that. It’s called ‘Finally Free’ based on the title track which talks about how Christ liberates us from a life of sin.

“I collaborated with Lionel Cyusa from Rwanda, Seyi from Nigeria and Wellington Kwenda from Zimbabwe because I want the music to appeal to everyone around the world, and different cultures too. There will be new videos coming for two songs on the album.”

The United States-based Zimbabwean doctor said Covdi-19 affected his music career and profession as a doctor of chemistry.

“Covid-19 has impacted live performances, but we are starting to do those since restrictions are getting more relaxed,” he said.

Mafireyi said when he returns home, he wanted to collaborate with Tamy Moyo.

“I take inspiration from Saint Jhn, Lecrae and Shingisai Siluma, not only for their vocal capabilities, but also for their courage to make genre-bending music that doesn’t conform to the norm,” he said.

“I used to do poetry and rap in high school, but did my first recording when I was 18. My first single ‘Long Way to Go’ was inspired by my patriotism and ‘Praise the Lord’ just expresses my love for Jesus. I love music so much that I would do it for no money.”

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Scientist Says Omicron Was a Group Find – Voice of America

The Botswana scientist who may well have discovered the omicron variant of the coronavirus says he has been on a “roller coaster of emotions,” with the pride of accomplishment followed by dismay over the travel bans immediately slapped on southern African countries.

“Is that how you reward science? By blacklisting countries?” Dr. Sikhulile Moyo, a virologist at the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership, said in an interview Thursday with The Associated Press.

“The virus does not know passports, it does not know borders,” he added. “We should not do geopolitics about the virus. … We should be collaborating and understanding.”

Moyo was doing genomic sequencing of COVID-19 samples at his lab in Botswana two weeks ago and noticed three cases that seemed dramatically different, with an unusual pattern showing multiple mutations. He continued studying the results and by early last week, decided to publicly release the data on the internet.

Soon scientists in South Africa said they had made the same findings. And an identical case in Hong Kong was also identified.

A new coronavirus variant had been discovered, and soon the World Health Organization named it omicron. It has now been identified in 38 countries and counting, including much of Western Europe and the United States. And the U.S. and many other nations have imposed flight restrictions to try to contain the emerging threat.

Speaking from his lab in Gaborone, Botswana’s capital, Moyo bristled at being described as the man who first identified omicron.

“Scientists should work together and the ‘who first did that’ syndrome should go. We should all be able to be proud that we all contributed in one way or the other,” said the 48-year-old scientist.

In fact, he noted that the variant was found to be something entirely new only by comparing it to other viruses online in a public database shared by scientists.

“The only way you can really see that you see something new is when you compare with millions of sequences. That’s why you deposit it online,” he said.

The Zimbabwe-born Moyo — who is also a research associate at Harvard’s school of public health, a married father of three, and a gospel singer — expressed pride in the way he and his international colleagues were transparent about their findings and sounded the alarm to the rest of the world.

“We’re excited that we probably gave a warning signal that may have averted many deaths and many infections,” he said.

A visitor wears plastic gloves to help curb the spread of the coronavirus upon arrival at an exhibition hall in Goyang, South Korea, Dec. 4, 2021.


A visitor wears plastic gloves to help curb the spread of the coronavirus upon arrival at an exhibition hall in Goyang, South Korea, Dec. 4, 2021.

Omicron startled scientists because it had more than 50 mutations.

“It is a big jump in the evolution of the virus and has many more mutations that we expected,” said Tulio de Oliveira, director of the Center for Epidemic Response and Innovation in South Africa, who taught Moyo when he was earning his Ph.D. in virology from South Africa’s Stellenbosch University.

Little is known about the variant, and the world is watching nervously. It’s not clear if it makes people more seriously ill or can evade the vaccine. But early evidence suggests it might be more contagious and more efficient at re-infecting people who have had a bout with COVID-19.

In the coming weeks, labs around the world will be working to find out what to expect from omicron and just how dangerous it is.

“What is important is collaboration and contribution,” Moyo said. “I think we should value that kind of collaboration because it will generate great science and great contributions. We need each other, and that’s the most important.”

South Africa is seeing a dramatic surge in infections that may be driven by omicron. The country reported more than 16,000 new COVID-19 cases Friday, up from about 200 per day in mid-November.

The number of omicron cases confirmed by genetic sequencing in Botswana has grown to 19, while South Africa has recorded more than 200. So far, most of the cases are in people who did not get vaccinated.

“I have a lot of hope from the data that we see, that those vaccinated should be able to have a lot of protection,” Moyo said. “We should try to encourage as many people to get vaccinated as possible.”

Moyo warned that the world “must go to a mirror and look at themselves” and make sure Africa’s 1.3 billion people are not left behind in the vaccination drive.

He credited earlier research and investment into fighting HIV and AIDS with building Botswana’s capacity for doing genetic sequencing. That made it easier for researchers to switch to working on the coronavirus, he said.

Amid the COVID-19 crisis, Moyo finds some cause for optimism.

“What gives me hope is that the world is now speaking the same language,” said Moyo, explaining that the pandemic has seen a new global commitment to scientific research and surveillance.

He added that the pandemic has also been a wake-up call for Africa.

“I think our policymakers have realized the importance of science, the importance of research,” Moyo said. “I think COVID has magnified, has made us realize that we need to focus on things that are important and invest in our health systems, invest in our primary health care.”

He added: “I think it’s a great lesson for humanity.”

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Zim Born Scientist Who Helped Identify Omicron Slams Travel Bans – New Zimbabwe.com

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AP


THE Botswana scientist who may well have discovered the omicron variant of the coronavirus says he has been on a roller-coaster of emotions, with the pride of accomplishment followed by dismay over the travel bans immediately slapped on southern African countries.

“Is that how you reward science? By blacklisting countries?” Sikhulile Moyo, a virologist at the Botswana Harvard AIDS Institute Partnership, said in an interview Thursday night with The Associated Press.

“The virus does not know passports, it does not know borders,” he added.

“We should be collaborating and understanding.”

Moyo was doing genomic sequencing of Covid-19 samples at his lab in Botswana two weeks ago and noticed three cases that seemed dramatically different, with an unusual pattern showing multiple mutations.

He continued studying the results and by early last week, decided to publicly release the data on the internet.

Soon scientists in South Africa said they had made the same findings and an identical case in Hong Kong was also identified.

A new coronavirus variant had been discovered, and soon the World Health Organization (WHO) named it omicron.

It has now been identified in 38 countries and counting, including much of Western Europe and the United States.

And the U.S. and many other nations have imposed flight restrictions to try to contain the emerging threat.

Speaking from his lab in Gaborone, Botswana’s capital, Moyo bristled at being described as the man who first identified omicron.

In fact, he noted that the variant was found to be something entirely new only by comparing it to other viruses online in a public database shared by scientists.

“The only way you can really see that you see something new is when you compare with millions of sequences. That’s why you deposit it online,” he said.

The Zimbabwe-born Moyo – who is also a research associate at Harvard’s school of public health, a married father of three, and a gospel singer – expressed pride in the way he and his international colleagues were transparent about their findings and sounded the alarm to the rest of the world.

Omicron startled scientists because it had more than 50 mutations.

Little is known about the variant, and the world is watching nervously.

It’s not clear if it makes people more seriously ill or can evade the vaccine.

But early evidence suggests it might be more contagious and more efficient at re-infecting people who have had a bout with Covid-19.

In the coming weeks, labs around the world will be working to find out what to expect from omicron and just how dangerous it is.

South Africa is seeing a dramatic surge in infections that may be driven by omicron.

The country reported more than 16,000 new Covid-19 cases Friday, up from about 200 per day in mid-November.

The number of omicron cases confirmed by genetic sequencing in Botswana has grown to 19, while South Africa has recorded more than 200.

So far, most of the cases are in people who did not get vaccinated.

He credited earlier research and investment into fighting HIV/AIDS with building Botswana’s capacity for doing genetic sequencing.

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gospel

Jaw-dropping – a show promoter’s experience – Chronicle

The Chronicle

Tongai Mbirimi
There are people who when you meet, have a huge impact on your life in so many ways. You start to see things from a different angle altogether.

There are influential people that I have met because of being in the entertainment space. One such person is none other than multimillionaire businessman and philanthropist Justice Maphosa.

I met Maphosa in Johannesburg in 2015 when he was planning and putting together his Gwanda International Gospel Festival first edition. It was a new gospel festival in Zimbabwe in the mining town of Gwanda.

This was going to be a spectacular and prestigious gospel extravaganza in Zimbabwe for the next four years, little did I know at that point.

Our first meeting, I remember it vividly. He had big plans for the festival, the stage, artistes, format of the event and logistics, everything he was planning was big.

I had just met a man with big plans which were, for me, very frightening to even think of. That was to be my first lesson on my encounter with Justice Maphosa.

Think and plan big, you will do big. We clicked and he then put me in charge of hotel accommodation and meals for all the visiting artistes and guests who were to attend the festival, both local and foreign.

I looked at the guest and artiste list and was in shock as there were so many high-profile artistes from South Africa and Zimbabwe including royal family members from some kingdoms in South Africa.

Planning took a rigorous four months, attention to detail was breath-taking.

Things became real when I was dispatched to Bulawayo and Gwanda a week before the event. To my amazement, the stage, sound system and VIP hosting tents were set up already right in the heart of Phelandaba Stadium a week before the event.

Everything was on point at the stadium and everything was big and proper. Logistics were seamless.

A day before the festival started, our guests arrived in style. A chartered Boeing 747 aircraft for the 140 artistes and guests who came from South Africa, and two private jets for the VIPs landed at Joshua Nkomo Airport in Bulawayo.

It was like watching a movie, the glitz and glamour, it was showtime!

In terms of setup and preparations, Maphosa’s setup in the heart of Gwanda was world-class. He went all out in his execution as he is a man of excellence and I remember him telling me that “excellence inspires people”. I was inspired I can confirm.

He had decided to host this praise and worship festival where he was born and raised as also his way of giving back to his community and praising God.

Single-handedly, Maphosa and his team would for the next four years, annually put the town of Gwanda into a standstill, gospel entertainment lockdown as over 15 000 people would throng Phelandaba Stadium to attend the three-day praise and worship extravaganza.

When something new comes to town, locals usually adopt a wait and see attitude. It was different in this case, the preparations were too appetising and the locals were keen to know what the festival was going to be about.

The festival indeed lived up to its billing. A tradition at the festival every year was the 30-minute firework display explosion just before midnight. This literally woke up everyone in Gwanda and the surrounding rural areas including those who had tried to ignore the festival, it was a spectacle.

The economic spillover effect of this Gwanda gospel festival was huge. All lodges/hotels in Gwanda would be fully booked, there was brisk business for supermarkets, bars and restaurants and the empowerment of the ladies in the community to do the catering for the artistes and selling foodstuff to festival-goers. Entertainment and arts is an industry after all.

Some of the amazing acts that graced the festival over the four years were Zimpraise, Rebecca Malope, Hlengiwe Mahlaba, Takesure Zamar Ncube, Dr Tumi, Oliver Mtukudzi and Mathias Mhere. This festival proved and showed me that any corner of Zimbabwe is full of possibilities. The people of Gwanda were blessed.

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