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The Star Inn at Harome: Michelin-starred restaurant 'reduced to ashes' – BBC News

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A Michelin-starred restaurant in a 14th Century building has been “reduced to ashes” after its thatched roof caught fire.

Chef Andrew Pern said he was called on Wednesday night and told The Star Inn at Harome, near Helmsley, North Yorkshire, was ablaze.

He said its straw roof was “perfect” fuel for a fire, and the building “didn’t stand a chance” once it had taken hold.

Firefighters remain at the scene.

The building, on the edge of the North York Moors National Park, caught fire shortly after 22:00 GMT.

A message on the restaurant’s Twitter account posted overnight said The Star had been “reduced to ashes” by the flames.

At its height, 45 firefighters tackled the blaze, North Yorkshire Fire & Rescue Service said, adding that all occupants had safely left when crews arrived.

Speaking to BBC Radio York, Mr Pern praised quick-thinking staff for their efforts to contain the blaze as they waited for help.

“It was smouldering at first and the staff did a brilliant job, they grabbed all the fire extinguishers, got a hosepipe from the cellar, they did an amazing job themselves.”

“There was nobody in the property, nobody hurt at all,” he said.

Damaged thatched roof and gutted building

Mr Pern, who took ownership of The Star Inn when he was 25, said he expected it would take about a year to get its main dining area up and running again.

The building’s frame had “just about gone”, he said, due to the 4ft (1.2m) straw roof.

“It’s one of those risks that comes with a thatched property, once it took a grip it didn’t really stand a chance,” he said.

He added that a newer section of the pub “should be OK, so we’ll be able to function in a fashion, somehow”.

Andrew Pern

PA Media

The Star Inn has become one of the most celebrated gastropubs in the country due to its “modern Yorkshire” dishes made from “locally sourced seasonal ingredients”.

The restaurant is described in the Michelin Guide as “oozing character with its low beamed ceilings”.

“While the restaurant side has a plush, luxurious feel, it’s still very much the village local and you’ll find the regulars supping on a pint of bespoke Two Chefs beer in the characterful bar,” it reads.

The Star Inn

Google

Mr Pern, who took charge in 1996, is also the managing director of restaurants in York and Whitby.

Fellow Michelin-starred Chef Tommy Banks, who owns the nearby Black Swan at Oldstead, said news of the fire was “devastating”.

“Our thoughts are with you Andrew and the whole team,” he wrote in a tweet.

The fire service said crews expect to be at the scene for some time, adding that a local farmer was helping to remove the thatched roof with a telehandler.

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Juarno Augustus helps Northampton pull the plug on sinking Bath – The Guardian

Juarno Augustus helps Northampton pull the plug on sinking Bath

  • Northampton 40-19 Bath
  • Danny Cipriani and Ben Spencer both injured
Juarno Augustus dives over for his second and Northampton's fourth try and Bath can only watch on.

It is not only raining but pouring for Bath. For weeks they have been struggling to find a win. Now they are struggling to field a senior team.

Northampton ran in six tries as Bath sank to nine defeats from nine league matches this season and by half-time they had lost their half-back pairing of Danny Cipriani and Ben Spencer to injuries.

Their woes began before the first whistle sounded, with their lock Josh McNally withdrawing during the warm-up. Cipriani left the field for a head-injury assessment and never returned, Spencer went off with a serious-looking problem to his right arm and in the second half the lock Mike Williams was forced off after a blow to his head.

With such a long injury list, it was not what Bath wanted – especially with a date to face Leinster in the Champions Cup next Saturday.

“It’s very early to tell but they are all relatively significant injuries, I would suggest,” said Bath director of rugby Stuart Hooper. “Sometimes you look at things and think ‘What’s going on?’ But I will never let anybody say a word against the application that the players showed.”

Bath’s last win in the Premiership was when Northampton visited The Rec in June, and apart from a brief wobble at the start of the second half this did not look like an occasion when Bath were going to break their duck.

Not that the Northampton director of rugby was ecstatic with his side’s display. “Our performance was probably only six out of 10,” said Chris Boyd, whose side now sit third in the table.

“We did well enough to get a good victory but it certainly wasn’t vintage.”

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Indeed, Saints were wasteful in attack at times and had they been more ruthless it would have been an even grimmer afternoon for Hooper and Co.

Bath are in a very public search for a defence coach and the opening 15 minutes provided compelling evidence of the need for that appointment. Saints found space down the wings far too easily. Tommy Freeman fed Rory Hutchinson for try while fans were still taking their seats, then Freeman crossed for a touchdown of his own.

How fortunate Bath were to have Sam Underhill on the field. While his team lacked coherence, the England flanker ran hard, tackled harder and polished off a lineout drive to get his team on the board.

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Ted Hill, the Worcester captain, believes his side are changing perceptions about the club after their narrow 32-31 victory over Wasps highlighted their improvement since October’s 66-point drubbing at Northampton. 

That defeat prompted the recruitment of Steve Diamond as lead rugby consultant and since then the Warriors have lost only one of their four league matches and put 68 points past Bristol in the Premiership Cup having won just one game all last season. 

“We are putting some results together and that breeds confidence,” said Hill. “We know we still have a lot to do, but we are moving in the right direction. It is a reflection of all the hard work everyone is putting in and it is good that we are climbing the table. People have a perception about us when it comes to the league and results like this will change it.” 

Worcester held on to win after Jimmy Gopperth missed a late touchline conversion. Wasps, who were 18 points behind with 30 minutes to go, were without 18 injured players. Worcester now switch their attention to the European Challenge Cup. They start their campaign at Newcastle on Friday night having secured a league draw there last weekend. 

The wing Ollie Hassell-Collins scored a hat-trick as London Irish continued their good run with a comfortable 43-21 victory over Newcastle. The Exiles have now lost just one of their last eight games in all competitions and they were clinical in running in six tries at the Brentford Community Stadium. 

Adam Radwan, the England wing, was a late try scorer for the Falcons but Irish backed up last week’s victory at champions Harlequins. The London Irish director of rugby, Declan Kidney, said: “Ollie has been motoring for us and I’m glad for him, but all of those tries were good team tries.”

Saints had the bonus point in the bag before half-time, with their No 8, Juarno Augustus, scoring either side of a yellow card for Williams.

Lewis Boyce salvaged an iota of respectability for Bath just before the break with a try from short range, but at 28-12 the contest already felt sealed in Saints’ favour.

The tries continued to flow after the break and Bath briefly threatened a revival. Will Stuart touched down after the hooker, Sam Matavesi, was sent to the sin-bin for offside, but Courtnall Skosan responded with two tries for the hosts to settle the home crowd’s nerves.

Boyd offered a consoling message for Hooper. “We went through a lean time last season during Covid and it’s tough being a coach and a player in that environment,” he said. “But at the end of the day they will come out of that hole.”

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AI Is Discovering Patterns in Pure Mathematics That Have Never Been Seen Before – ScienceAlert

We can add suggesting and proving mathematical theorems to the long list of what artificial intelligence is capable of: Mathematicians and AI experts have teamed up to demonstrate how machine learning can open up new avenues to explore in the field.

While mathematicians have been using computers to discover patterns for decades, the increasing power of machine learning means that these networks can work through huge swathes of data and identify patterns that haven’t been spotted before.

In a newly published study, a research team used artificial intelligence systems developed by DeepMind, the same company that has been deploying AI to solve tricky biology problems and improve the accuracy of weather forecasts, to unknot some long-standing math problems.

“Problems in mathematics are widely regarded as some of the most intellectually challenging problems out there,” says mathematician Geordie Williamson from the University of Sydney in Australia.

“While mathematicians have used machine learning to assist in the analysis of complex data sets, this is the first time we have used computers to help us formulate conjectures or suggest possible lines of attack for unproven ideas in mathematics.”

The team shows AI advancing a proof for Kazhdan-Lusztig polynomials, a math problem involving the symmetry of higher-dimensional algebra that has remained unsolved for 40 years.

The research also demonstrated how a machine learning technique called a supervised learning model was able to spot a previously undiscovered relationship between two different types of mathematical knots, leading to an entirely new theorem.

Knot theory in math plays into various other challenging fields of science as well, including genetics, fluid dynamics, and even the behavior of the Sun’s corona. The discoveries that AI makes can therefore lead to advances in other areas of research.

“We have demonstrated that, when guided by mathematical intuition, machine learning provides a powerful framework that can uncover interesting and provable conjectures in areas where a large amount of data is available, or where the objects are too large to study with classical methods,” says mathematician András Juhász from the University of Oxford in the UK.

One of the benefits of machine learning systems is the way that they can look for patterns and scenarios that programmers didn’t specifically code them to look out for – they take their training data and apply the same principles to new situations.

The research shows that this sort of high-speed, ultra-reliable, large-scale data processing can act as an extra tool working with mathematicians’ natural intuition. When you’re dealing with complex, lengthy equations, that can make a significant difference.

The researchers hope that their work leads to many further partnerships between academics in the fields of mathematics and artificial intelligence, opening up the opportunity for findings that would otherwise be undiscovered.

“AI is an extraordinary tool,” says Williamson. “This work is one of the first times it has demonstrated its usefulness for pure mathematicians, like me.”

“Intuition can take us a long way, but AI can help us find connections the human mind might not always easily spot.”

The research has been published in Nature.

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AI Is Discovering Patterns in Pure Mathematics That Have Never Been Seen Before – ScienceAlert

We can add suggesting and proving mathematical theorems to the long list of what artificial intelligence is capable of: Mathematicians and AI experts have teamed up to demonstrate how machine learning can open up new avenues to explore in the field.

While mathematicians have been using computers to discover patterns for decades, the increasing power of machine learning means that these networks can work through huge swathes of data and identify patterns that haven’t been spotted before.

In a newly published study, a research team used artificial intelligence systems developed by DeepMind, the same company that has been deploying AI to solve tricky biology problems and improve the accuracy of weather forecasts, to unknot some long-standing math problems.

“Problems in mathematics are widely regarded as some of the most intellectually challenging problems out there,” says mathematician Geordie Williamson from the University of Sydney in Australia.

“While mathematicians have used machine learning to assist in the analysis of complex data sets, this is the first time we have used computers to help us formulate conjectures or suggest possible lines of attack for unproven ideas in mathematics.”

The team shows AI advancing a proof for Kazhdan-Lusztig polynomials, a math problem involving the symmetry of higher-dimensional algebra that has remained unsolved for 40 years.

The research also demonstrated how a machine learning technique called a supervised learning model was able to spot a previously undiscovered relationship between two different types of mathematical knots, leading to an entirely new theorem.

Knot theory in math plays into various other challenging fields of science as well, including genetics, fluid dynamics, and even the behavior of the Sun’s corona. The discoveries that AI makes can therefore lead to advances in other areas of research.

“We have demonstrated that, when guided by mathematical intuition, machine learning provides a powerful framework that can uncover interesting and provable conjectures in areas where a large amount of data is available, or where the objects are too large to study with classical methods,” says mathematician András Juhász from the University of Oxford in the UK.

One of the benefits of machine learning systems is the way that they can look for patterns and scenarios that programmers didn’t specifically code them to look out for – they take their training data and apply the same principles to new situations.

The research shows that this sort of high-speed, ultra-reliable, large-scale data processing can act as an extra tool working with mathematicians’ natural intuition. When you’re dealing with complex, lengthy equations, that can make a significant difference.

The researchers hope that their work leads to many further partnerships between academics in the fields of mathematics and artificial intelligence, opening up the opportunity for findings that would otherwise be undiscovered.

“AI is an extraordinary tool,” says Williamson. “This work is one of the first times it has demonstrated its usefulness for pure mathematicians, like me.”

“Intuition can take us a long way, but AI can help us find connections the human mind might not always easily spot.”

The research has been published in Nature.

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