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Everyday ways to be a hero – NewsDay

kindness runners water

SOMETIMES we make the mistake of believing that the only heroes out there are the people we watch on television, read about in news reports, or see in the movies.  The truth is that each one of us has the ability to become a hero to someone.  Opportunities for heroism are everywhere.

Here then is our list of 10 ways that you can become a hero. Keep in mind that this list reflects our own personal view of heroism as exemplary actions directed toward improving the lives of others.

Study the Greats — Almost all of us have personal heroes and legends who have inspired us. Read their biographies and strive to discern the qualities that made them great.  Look for common patterns. The likes of Nelson Mandela, Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King had a vision of a better world and were willing to make life-altering sacrifices to achieve that vision. They were smart, strong, courageous, resilient, and selfless.  They did not let setbacks deter them and showed great leadership.  Cultivating these traits and life habits can send you on your own heroic journey.

Be the change you want to see in the world — This line, a paraphrased version of a quote from Gandhi, is saturated with truth and wisdom.  People can easily spot a hypocrite — the person who tells us to give to the poor yet gives little himself; or the person who advocates world peace yet spouts hatred on Facebook or Twitter.  True heroes live the words they speak.

Listen for the call — Many heroes report having a calling to act on behalf of animal rights, to run for president or to quit their high-paying jobs to serve others at low pay. Your own calling may be less dramatic but no less important to those you help in life.

Promote the good rather than oppose the bad — The most successful, heroic people focus on the positive. They know that negative energy, even when directed against dark forces in the world, is ineffective for promoting positive change. Mother Teresa is famous for saying, “I was once asked why I do not participate in anti-war demonstrations. I said that I will never do that, but as soon as you have a pro-peace rally, I will be there.”

Be courteous — How hard is it to give a break to someone who’s obviously under stress or simply in a hurry? This sort of charity is so not me, which is why I find it so important to be kind to others.

Perform small gestures — A good friend of ours, Paul, tells us that he once hugged a male friend in a grocery store simply because the man looked a bit worn and unhappy. Later, that man thanked Paul for that hug. “He said it completely changed his outlook and maybe even his life,” He said I was his hero. It was such a little thing I almost did not do it. Simple gestures of kindness can mean the world to someone who is fighting a tough personal battle.

Perform random acts of kindness — In 2000 the movie Pay it Forward resurrected an idea first proposed by the ancient Greek playwright Menander: If someone has done you a good deed, you can repay the act by performing good deeds to others rather than to the original benefactor. Others call it anonymous giving. You can start a wave of human kindness by helping a student with tuition, raking someone’s leaves, buying someone groceries, or cooking a meal for a neighbour etc.

Volunteer your time — These last three suggestions focus on serving others. Your service can take the form of your time. Spending some loving, caring time with others can be far more meaningful than spending money on them.  Visit a nursing home.  Volunteer to help adults learn how to read. Spend time with children. Make someone feel loved today.

Volunteer your talent — Everyone has a talent they can share to enrich the lives of others. Make an inventory of your talents and use them to improve the lives of others.

Donate — . By donating the things that you do not need, want, or use, you allow another person to benefit from them rather than sending them to a landfill.— TeenKidsNews

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American movie director longs to shoot movies in Africa – NewsDay

Jaron D “JD” Lawrence

BY Charles Myambo
GLOBALLY acclaimed American movie director and entrepreneur Jaron D “JD” Lawrence has reportedly earned close to US$100 million through his production work and other ventures.

He is well respected in Hollywood and widely regarded as one of the best movie directors for his genre worldwide. He has described Alpha Media Holding’s chairman Trevor Ncube as a media innovator and global thought leader.

United States-based NewsDay Life & Style correspondent Charles Myambo (ND) caught up with him.

ND: You are easily one of the greatest drama directors in Hollywood. How did you master the art of drama and comedy?

JDL: “I owe it all to God without him none of what I do would be possible. With regards to mastering the art, I still have so much more to learn. I am just enjoying the process.”

ND: There are some sources online which say you have made over US$100 million dollars from directing movies and from your various business ventures. Did you ever imagine making it this big?

JDL: “One hundred million? Tell them to send me my cheque. My imagination is limitless with thoughts, ideas etc, so with that in mind, I guess I have so much more to achieve creatively and financially.

“I am always looking for strategic financial partners.”

ND: You are one of the most down to earth people I know. How do you remain grounded given all the success you have realised over the past few decades?

JDL: “God”

ND: Is charity something that you feel strongly about and if so, how do you think you can inspire more people to do their part and help contribute to charity worldwide? What role does music have in charity awareness?

JDL: “Charity begins at home. I learned that a long time ago. There are so many philanthropic things that I personally want to do”.

ND: How do you feel about the continent of Africa and do you one day envisage hosting some of your shows or shooting a movie in Africa?

JDL: “That is like living with dad and someone asks you how you feel about mom. It is the motherland.  I love it.  Although I have never been, I want to go. I would love to do shows and shoot movies there.”

ND: Given your business acumen, I would like to know what you think of African business moguls like Nigerian billionaire Aliko Dangote, Zimbabwean billionaire Strive Masiyiwa, Zimbabwean media tycoon Trevor Ncube and Dr Divine Ndlukula?

JDL: “I don’t know them personally, I only know of them, but I would love to do business with them.

“Strive, Dr Divine and Dangote are well known for their fortunes and business acumen while Trevor on the other hand, despite being an astute businessman himself mainly stands out for being a media innovator and global thought leader”.

ND: Danai Gurira is a global sensation mostly known for her roles in Avengers Endgame, Black Panther and The Walking Dead. Thandie Newton is mostly known for her award-winning roles in Mission Impossible and Norbit. Both these actresses hail from Zimbabwe. What do you think about them?

JDL: “I am a fan of Danai and Thandie’s work. They are both super talented and I wish them continued success.

“I would absolutely love to work with them provided the opportunity presents itself.”

  • Follow us on Twitter @NewsDayZimbabwe

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Africa CDC warns possible new Covid variant amid spike in new cases – Social News XYZ

Africa CDC warns possible new Covid variant amid spike in new cases

Addis Ababa, May 20 (SocialNews.XYZ) There is a possibility that a new Covid variant would emerge in Africa in a foreseeable future, Ahmed Ogwell, the acting director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC), has warned.

“The increase is a clear sign that there is (a) high possibility a new variant, which is more transmissible, is to appear,” Ogwell said during a weekly briefing Thursday.


According to figures from the Africa CDC, the African continent has seen a 36 per cent average increase of new COVID-19 cases over the past four weeks, with Central and Eastern Africa regions reporting increasing new COVID-19 cases by 113 and 54 per cent, respectively, Xinhua news agency reported.

The Africa CDC, the specialized healthcare agency of the African Union, called for increased testing to locate which part of the continent the new variant would be appearing in.

“We need to do more testing and sequencing so that we can be able to understand where the outbreaks are and identify what variant is emerging,” Ogwell said.

He also called for an enhanced vaccination rollout to sustainably address low vaccination service against the pandemic across the continent. “We are distinctively seeing increasing deaths due to the pandemic as cases are surging over the last four weeks.”

Five African countries reported the highest numbers of newly confirmed Covid cases over the last one week with South Africa reporting 50,404 cases, Tanzania 1,482, Namibia 1,054, Zimbabwe 910 and Burundi 817 cases, according to the acting director.

Source: IANS

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About Gopi

Gopi Adusumilli is a Programmer. He is the editor of SocialNews.XYZ and President of AGK Fire Inc.

He enjoys designing websites, developing mobile applications and publishing news articles on current events from various authenticated news sources.

When it comes to writing he likes to write about current world politics and Indian Movies. His future plans include developing SocialNews.XYZ into a News website that has no bias or judgment towards any.

He can be reached at [email protected]

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African scientists and technology could drive future black hole discoveries – NewsDay

Roger Deane/Iniyan Natarajan
ASTRONOMERS have revealed the first image of the black hole at the centre of our galaxy, the Milky Way. The image was produced by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration, an international team made up of over 300 scientists on five continents — including Africa.

Black holes were predicted by Albert Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity over a century ago. They are regions of space so dense that nothing, including light, can escape. Their boundary is known as the event horizon, which marks the point of no return. That’s just one of the reasons these objects are hidden from our eyes. The other is that they are exceedingly small, when placed in their cosmic context. If our Milky Way galaxy were the size of a soccer field, its black hole event horizon would be a million times smaller than a pin prick at centrefield.

How, then, can one photograph them? Our team did so by capturing light from the hot swirling gas in the immediate vicinity of the black hole. This light, with a wavelength of 1 millimetre, is recorded by a global network of antennas that form a single, Earth-size virtual telescope.

The light looks rather like a ring, a characteristic signature that is the direct consequence of two key processes. First, the black hole is so dense that it bends the path of light near it. Second, it captures light that strays too close to the event horizon. The combined effect produces a so-called black hole shadow — a brightened ring surrounding a distinct deficit of light centred on the black hole. In the case of our Milky Way black hole, this ring has the apparent size of a doughnut on the moon, requiring an extraordinary engineering effort to bring it into focus.

The unveiling of an image of our black hole, Sagittarius A*, is not just a massive moment for science. It could also be an important catalyst for diversifying African astrophysics research using existing strengths. We were the only two of more than 300 EHT team members based on the African continent. The continent doesn’t host any EHT telescopes — we were brought on board because of the expertise we have developed in preparation for the world’s largest radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), to be co-hosted by South Africa and Australia.

Why the image is important

This is not the first time a black hole image has captured people’s attention. We were also members of the team that captured the first ever image of a black hole in 2019 (this one is at the centre of a different galaxy, Messier 87, which is 55 million light years away). It has been estimated that more than 4,5 billion people saw that image. Sagittarius A* has also dominated headlines and captured people’s imaginations.

But there’s more to this result than just an incredible image. A plethora of rich scientific results has been described in ten publications by the team. Here are three of our primary highlights.

First, the image is a remarkable validation of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. The EHT has now imaged two black holes with masses that differ by a factor of over 1 000. Despite the dramatic difference in mass, the measured size and shape are consistent with theoretical predictions.

Second, we have now imaged black holes with very different environments. A wealth of prior research over the past two or three decades shows strong empirical evidence that galaxies and their black holes co-evolve over cosmic time, despite their completely disparate sizes. By zooming into the event horizon of black holes in giant galaxies like M87, as well as more typical galaxies like our own Milky Way, we learn more about how this seemingly implausible relationship between the black hole and its host galaxy plays out.

Third, the image provides us with new insights on the central black hole in our own galactic home. It is the nearest such beast to Earth, so it provides a unique laboratory to understand this interplay — not unlike scrutinising a tree in your own garden to better understand the forests on the distant horizon.

Southern Africa’s geographic advantage

We are proud to be part of the team that produced the first black hole images. In future, we believe South Africa, and the African continent more broadly (including a joint Dutch-Namibian initiative), could play a critical role in making the first black hole
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As has been the case with the country’s key role in paleoanthropology, there are contributions to global astronomy that can only be made from South African soil. Sagittarius A* lies in the southern sky, passing directly above South Africa. That is a major reason this image of the Milky Way’s centre, taken by the MeerKAT (a precursor to the SKA) is the best there is.

South Africa also has well-established infrastructure at its astronomical sites, which are protected by legislation. And it has world-class engineers at the forefront of their craft. This makes for low-cost, high-performance telescopes delivered on time and to budget.

New technology is also on our side: a cutting-edge simultaneous multi-frequency receiver design, pioneered by our Korean colleagues, means that EHT sites no longer need to be the most pristine, high-altitude locations on Earth.

All the elements are in place for a dramatic increase in the number of young Africans who participate in this new era of black hole imaging and precision tests of gravity. In the coming years, we hope to be writing about findings that couldn’t have been made without technology on South African soil, as well as African scientists leading high-impact, high-visibility EHT science in synergy with our multi-wavelength astronomy and high-energy astrophysics programmes.

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